Using the Exchange Control Panel ECP in Exchange Server 2010

 

The Exchange Control Panel (ECP) is a web based graphical administration tool that's been added into Exchange Server 2010. The ECP has basic functionality and Microsoft is constantly adding new items to it. The Exchange Control Panel is good for doing basic work inside Exchange Server. This video is part of a full training course called EXCH2010: Designing and Implementing Microsoft Exchange Server 2010.

To help introduce Interface Video Training, the first 18 videos in this Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 course are available for free below. The entire Video Training Library is available for only $25 per month.

Instructor: Mike Pfeiffer, Microsoft MVP
Video Style: Screencast
View the entire Exchange Server 2010 Course


Microsoft Exchange Server Server 2010 online video training Interface Technical Training


Video transcript:
Using the Exchange Control Panel ECP in Exchange Server 2010

The Exchange Control Panel (ECP) is a web‑based graphical administration tool that's been added into Exchange Server 2010. The ECP has basic functionality and Microsoft is constantly adding new items to it. The Exchange Control Panel is good for doing basic work inside Exchange Server.

Let's just dive right in, take a look at it. First, go in to one of your CAS Servers, I'll go to CAS Hub 1 and provide a slash ECP.

The ECP virtual directory is the Exchange Control Panel Application. You can get to this from OWA as well when you're logged in.  

I've given my user account organization management rights which means I can do anything in Exchange Server.

I'm going to log in to the control panel as an administrator.

You can see here up at the top that it says, under options Manage My Organization.

The Exchange Control Panel allows you to manage your own account as well as administrators to manage the organization. When I hit the ECP virtual directory directly in the address bar, I'm managing it as an administrator.

On this first screen, you can see the three items at the top called Slabs. There's one for distribution groups, one for external context.

When you're in these items, notice I got this list of mailboxes.

I can do a search from my own account or I could search for Bob maybe. There's that mailbox, I can double click in here.

Then I can do some basic things like modifying his contact information, his first and last name.

I could add an additional email address to his account so I can say bob@uss.local.

Unfortunately, right now, I can't create mailboxes from the ECP but this might be useful if I wanted to delegate some basic management task to people where I don't want to install the Exchange tools on their machine, I’d rather them just go to the Exchange Control Panel in a web browser and add additional email addresses for people or exchange some things about the role assignment policy settings or mailbox features or something like that.

You can also give administrators the ability to create Distributions Groups from the Exchange Control Panel.

Additionally, there are other options under Mail Control such as Rules, Journaling and Delivery Reports.

The Roles Slab that we're currently on gives you the ability to create Transport Roles that are like Outlook Roles for your Transport System.

Under Phone & Voice for Active Sync as well.

I’ll sign out of this and I will show you how to get to the ECP from OWA.

When I'm inside my webmail, if I want to get into the Exchange Control Panel, I can go under the Options tab and click the dropdown. That will get me the option to get into control panel. What you'll want to do is click on See All Options link.

As you can see, once you get in to the Exchange Control Panel, I’m under Manage Myself so you're basically managing your own account.

One of the things that the ECP gives people the ability to do is some self‑service. I'm logged in as my own account here where I could change things about my account such as some of my contact information, the location, things like that, contact numbers. This would be me changing my own account. I could let people know I'm on vacation or setting an out‑of‑office automatic reply.

When I click on Tell people you’re on vacation shortcut link, you can see it takes me into the automatic reply screen where I can set my own automatic replies, set the start and end time, set the message.

This is for both internal and external recipients.

One of the nice things is here I can go to this dropdown and select what to manage.

Not only can I do automatic replied from my own mailbox but I can also do this for another user as well. You just have to make sure that I have the right permissions to do this.

That's actually taken care of by something called RBAC or Role‑Based Access Control which is an essential component to securing your Microsoft Exchange Server environment.

More online training videos from Interface Technical Training.

For Instructor-Led live classes, see our complete Course Schedule. Many courses are available online with RemoteLive™.

 

Posted in Exchange Server | Posted in , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code class="" title="" data-url=""> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong> <pre class="" title="" data-url=""> <span class="" title="" data-url="">